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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
of ucla law school where they argue constitution. today they're discussing money out, voters in. >> and jayar jackson will love this. tweet us on @tytoncurrent if you can guess who it is. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. >> it's no secret to regular viewers of this show that cenk has long been passionate, unbelievably passionate about campaign finance reform. this past weekend at ucla law school, he was invited to participate in a conference called money out voters in. let's take a look at how that worked out. >> cenk: we're here on the campus of ucla law school. where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out voters in. the issue of getting money out of politics. they'll be discussing the pr
detail. >> what you make me proud as a former law professor of what a law professor can do. you have done tremendous things for the case of marriage equality. my question follows up on your notion of marriage pluralism. my former colleague says marriage is two things -- a standard form contract that establishes certain kinds of liberal basic rights but also a sanctification. constituting form. she argues in liberal state has no business sanctifying relationships and that will be ought to be doing is be establishing, dis-establishing marriages altogether. do you see that 20 years and now when you give this talk will not even use the word marriage? >> it depends a william e. my liberal. if you are a libertarian liberal, as the cato institute is, they would say yes. if you are more of the state should create conditions for human flourishing, the answer is not simple. here is what i will say more broadly. one of the easy mistakes of the whole debate is an over investment in lesbian and gay people on marriage and family lot generally. most people who are in relationships are in relationships b
, employers can't skirt labor laws said they have to pay fair wages and abide the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working and most honorable people in our society should not have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i'm truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know that there've been tensions in the past, but i believe like the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. that when we have this tensions we have to embrace them so we can get past them. this is our time to come together, break issues down. let's get a solution on this issue because i know when we come together we can figure this out. i had the privilege of march and most recently this year in the annual march from selma mike on my end for us to montgomery and alabama it was an incredible feeling. there i was with congressma
sputnik and schering americans. because of it, there was a program that got me through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic at all -- of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who
of law. the agreement and the private market competition it launched help spur in the years that followed trillions of dollars in new investment, in infrastructure, in telecommunications around the world, and help spur a huge certainly unprecedented wave of worldwide telecommunication technology innovation, mobile and internet. global access to communications service rose in the years following that agreement, especially for mobile services in developing countries that took the opportunity to leapfrog past wired networks. between 2001-2011, mobile phone adoption increased globally from 15% to 86%, one decade. from roughly 900 million people around the world having basic mobile service to 6 billion, in a decade. now, the u.s. benefit from this global growth, u.s. export in information and communication technology services quadrupled over that decade. and as a global market continues to grow as we get those new metrics that i described, mobile broadband access went from one to 5 billion, the u.s. economy will continue to benefit. but given his history and the fortune seat as a junior staffe
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
to harvard law school and at the origin of one of his brothers immigrated out west to the illinois to clean up where the mining industry was in its heyday. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, arrived in a steamboat in this muddy mining town, bordered himself and a log cabin, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer and got involved politically, ran for congress, served eight terms and befriended abraham lincoln and ulysses s. grant and as they rose, washburn stayed with them as a colleague during the civil war and after grant was elected president initially appointed washburn secretary of state and washburn became very ill, after ten days he submitted his resignation to president grant show grant regretfully had his resignation and he regained his health which was always very fragile and grant the then offered him the position as minister of france, ambassador of france. >> michael hill on washburn, minister to france in the 1870 franco prussian war, and the only power of the state providing political and humanitarian support. q
the time he left honolulu at age 18 to go to college, until the time he went to harvard law school, nine years, intensely tried to resolve the contradictions life threw at him in the way every teenager searches for identity. >> heƱhr had more things to rese than you and me. >> he was an integrated personality that gave him the confidence to get to the white house and got him in trouble in the white house, and john could document because he came into this thinking, well, if i resolve the contradictions life threw at me, why can't congress and the rest of the world? that gave him a sense of exceptionalism and a bit of naivety. i'm not saying he's completely naive, but that hurt him in the first period. >> only really in 2011, i mean, in 2009 and 2010, i think that the record is under estimated by people, and that he was -- >> certainly -- >> in some ways using a kind of what the princeton historian fred called the hidden hand of the presidency. why didn't he, you know, propose a health care bill and drop it on the steps of congress and say pass this, you know? he had the votes to do it. t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)